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a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of miff favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon and it will be american. >> first of all, if it's a legitimate rape, the fe plael body has ways to shut that whole thing double. >> the dangers of carbon dioxide. tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one pirn and it's to newt gingrich. congr congratulatio congratulations, newt. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, carl rove, plus the award for pli political performer of the year. [ thunder crashes ] [ male announcer ] if you think all batteries are the same... consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. g
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. >>> just reading some of your tweets here about who i will predict will win the massachusetts senate rate. afleck, another one here. dave is not there 33 tweeted and then changed his mind to matt damon. ashley judd. no, i'm not going to predict that. but i hope
that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thoughtht i would show you wht thuld happen if we change into thspeaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $1
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week
at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or theel
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
's is a challenge the antiscience and pro science rubric, and i wonder if you'd say that in fact it can withstand that sort of thing as we look at it over time, whether it's a little bit of a too shallow way of looking at things whether it's chris mooney on the left and the approach you have here. the things are more complicate than pro science or antiscience would have thought. >> you're absolutely correct there is a role for bioethics in science, okay and n and i would be hesitant to call someone antiscience if they are objecting to something on biothal grounds. you can gate ph.d in bioethics. that's how complicated this field has become. so i agree there's a value in not just plowing forward and doing whatever we want, whenever we want there is a wrote from jurrasic park, we were so obsessed to see if we could do thing, we never stopped to think if we should. so heaven forbid i get my philosophy from jurrasic park, but he makes a good point. i come on the side that embryonic stem cells is something we should be doing, including induced stem cells. you prove we don't need embryonic stem cells.
that love. so that's my challenge to everybody, and science shows this. if you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star -- [laughter] but just imagine when you look up and see a star, think to yours that a that's -- yourself that that's hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of those stars no longer exist n. the billions of years it's taken for that light to get to you, the star itself is gone. but the energy and light that a body gives off while it's alive goes on forever. it's immutable. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time on this earth, but every single day we should be determined to burn as bright, warm and brilliant as possible. and that's the challenge. .. and knowing that, that gives us all an obligation to give back in every way possible and to me it's a secret to living a life of joy, a life of solace and a life of love. so thank you. [applause] >> want to thank the mayor for being with us. we want to take, for a couple of minutes a
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing d
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
to everybody, and this is -- science shows us, you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star, but imagine when you look up and see a star, think hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of the stars you are looking at are gone. they no longer exist, and the billion of years the light takes to get to you, the star is actually gone, but the energy and life is immuneble and goes on forever. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time on earth, but every day, have a determination to burn as bright, warm, and brilliant as possible. that's the challenge. ultimately, the change makers are never the elected officials or the names read in history. this country has been fueled because of a conspiracy love. we don't know the names of the people, but they're the ones today that we benefit. i'll end, but my father, who i talk about in the book, had colorful things to say about me as i kid. he grew up in poverty, and i grew up in relative privilege. he said, boy, don't loo
colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was the leading spokesperson for black civil rights, and a leads spokesperson for women's rights and the conservatives said america's fascistses are those that thing wall street comes first and the american people come second. so he had enemies and the enemies wantedded to get rid of him. but he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in california, gallup released a poll asking voters who they want on the ticket. 65% said they wanted wallace, 2% said they wanted harry truman the question how were the party bosses going to -- roosevelt was feeble and when they party bosses come to him and want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says i want wallace but i can't fight this by myself. i i'm not strong enough, and he finally gave in, and it was table that he did. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every one of the roosevelt kids was furious. they were huge w
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the senate's republican minority leader mitch mccon
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. and you wouldn't have it any other way.e. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the
or reimagined seven industries. he did it, isaacson says, by standing at the crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's so
with a computer science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelor's in 2009 and my first job was actually at a retail store at the mall. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. so i figured i would go to law school to change to be where i want to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. he is still in college and worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> they settle with retail businesses. even all my friends work at mcdonald's and places like that because of the higher jobs that are hard to get these days. >> reporter: with the low- paying jobs, it will be that much harder. with tuitions rising across the nation, those bills are stacking up. >> one of my friends bar tend and work at the restaurant just to pay off the loan that she got. >> reporter: she has a 4-year- old as she is worried about what kind of a world her daughter will face. >> it is really disstressing. i got out of the school in the early 90s. it's a tough market. >> reporter: with all these colleg
. the government-affiliated chinese academy of social sciences released its assessment of the analyst situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the sonkuku, apparently to jeopardi jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it further. china-japan relations, as well as northeast asia's security instability will face difficult challenges. analysts said the report is thought to be aimed at thwarting further moves of the president to be inaugerated this week. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of pug. he is known as an expert in economic policy. park says pug will play a strong role at shaping foreign policy. she also named yun as her spokesperson. yun is vice president of the newspaper and television association. he studied at tokyo's ko university. pu
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. real people with our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15. it's our new maine stays! like chicken with wine sauce or bacon wrapped shrimp. try 15 under $15 and sea food differently. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ a delicious new way to get essential vitamins you need. just bite into the tasty shell... to a chewy vitamin core for a unique multivitamin sensation! new centrum flavor burst. >>> "nightline" continues from new york city with terry moran. >> in the age of google and siri, chances are you can't remember your boss's phone number. or maybe the capital of anywhere. but there are some people who make it their business to remember absolutely everything without the help of technolog
science professor who left the year before i arrived to work on a phd in east ucla. his parents had been on the faculty at aup and though he had made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a scholar in the middle east, gila home to leave the school during the difficult time when beirut had fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcol
for $49.99. the stuff of science fictio the test. the private space flight company successful . >>> company space eex is testing a rocket. they successfully conducted a test flight of its reusable rocket. this is in texas. the rocket lifted off -- touchdown on the launching pad. they said it's almost ready for its first real lift off. they will save a lot of money. >>> netflix users, i got good news for us. you are in luck. the streaming video service is back online following a christmas eve outage. on its twitter page they blamed amazon's cloud for the problem. wire magazine reports it's the third time this year that an amazon outage has disrupted netflix. they are back online. >>> coming up, santa that prefers a snow board instead. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, need a sleigh to cut a pathn the mountain in steamboat springs, colorado... he bro his snowboard! and even thoh he didn't deliver any prese, he brought lots of smiles te . >>> a man brought his snow board and even though he didn't bring presents's brought a lot of smiles to the skiers who stopped to watch him catch some air. h
with like science experiments. >> eye on the bay produce california cities sandra murray -- producer sandra murray discovered it while doing a news segment. forget about rush delivery. simply email or print the ecard and your gift is ready to go. >> by creating electricity from the heat of the fire it can charge your phone, light or other gadgets. >> it gain popularity following hurricane sandy enabling those without power to charge their phone without fire. it is also back ordered and comes with a ding staff gift tag for last minute holiday orders. and, finally, like a juicer but better. justed a frozen bananas and you have a healthy snack with no sugar, milk or added calories. it was a hit in the newsroom. now, it cost about 50 bucks. target stays open until 9:00. so, rush out and grab it now if you want it. >>> if the weather keeps up we will need one of those bio lights. >> reporter: we have a lot of nasty weather. calmer weather towards christmas. outside, the south bay, our view, we had a mostly sunny day. the beautiful bay bridge on christmas eve. these are your temperatures outside
science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelors in 2009 and my first job was at a retail store. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. i figured i have to go to law school to get where i wanted to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. bill song is still. >> college and he's worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> all my friends have a hard time. all of my friends with high degrees working at mcdonalds or some places like that, the higher jobs are harder to get nowadays. >> reporter: with a low paying job it's harder for the college grads to pay back student loans. those bills are stacking up. >> one my friends bar tends and works at a restaurant just trying to pay off the lobes she got. >> reporter: maria has a 4-year- old and she's worried about what kind of world her daughter will face. >> it's really distressing. i got out of school in the early 90s. it was a tough market then, but not the way it is now. >> reporter: with all these college graduates in r
to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to explore at the limits of our eyes was possible. the goal was to drill down of two miles to reach the waters below. the drilling went wrong. it did not get deeper. but hot water leaked into the ice around. it was a major blow to a daring project. huge quantities of snow were malted, heated up, sterilized. this team just not work. >> the pace was slower than we had planned for. we did not have enough fuel to get to the service of the lake. we are extremely disappointed by that outcome. >> the drilling was not the only problem, just before christmas, a vital spare part had to be flown out all the way from britain. in the end, three years of planning and 8 million pounds have drawn a blank. they might try again. for now, the lak
's. he and his wife sylvia began program making in the 1950's. it was when he combined science- fiction with puppetry that he achieved his most famous creations. the pilot was commissioned for 321 our programs. -- 32 one hour programs. >> he said it was not day television series. and then he walked all the way up to me and said, this is a feature film. >> stingray was the first-ever british children's series to be filmed in color. >> anything can happen in the next half hour. >> capt. scarlet featured more realistic puppets and darker situations. this was the last of his series to be made with his puppet the technique. >> 20 kilometers away. >> one character remains closest to his heart. >> my favorite character was parker. >> he will be remembered as a man who entertained adults and children, using mechanical puppets, which still produce stories filled with emotion and excitement. >> matt zimmerman was the voice of allen tracy, the blond one. he played him, he did the voice. we spoke to him earlier and he told me more about his relationship with jerry anderson. >> he was an amazing man
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
this down to a science now. >> a little girl would be happy with a pink monkey. >> we keep track of them. >> by boys and girls, by age, by year. >> three, two, one. >> yay. >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 14 years old. >> last year we had 15 carts loaded up with gifts. >> you people are so awesome we really appreciate this. >> the kids just love meeting santa. >> he's excited to meet santa claus right now. >> ho, ho, ho, merry christmas. >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smiles, there you go. >> merry christmas family. >> are you going to ask me what i want for christmas? >> yes, what do you want for christmas. >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably like 500 children. >> start out with five right now. >> my grandma, she's a go getter. she just loves what she does and she's so good at it and you know it's just part of her personality. that's how it's gotten where it's reached where it has. >> good job pedro. >> thank you. >> we came out here the first year to do santa and i don't know it just grew on us and we wanted to come back. >> good
. do a lot of returns. >> reporter: stores throughout the mall displayed sale science, some showing as much as 75%off. >> we want to sell as much, put the spring goods out. we are going to be -- i know we are. >> reporter: november and december count up to 40% of yearly sales, the last two months before christmas were the weakest since 2008. retailers hope to make up by slashing prices, customers had different take its on the deals they saw. >> last year was much better. >> reporter: dispointing? >> little bit. >> 50% off at gap. marked down -- i got tanks, underwear and, yeah. >> reporter: you are happy. >> yeah. >> reporter: and many are expecting to use their gift cards today and they will have plenty of chances to do that. the mall has extended hours today here at valley fair. they will be open until ten tonight. ktvu. >> thank you. for a lot of people the gifts are now unwrapped and sorted. before going to the customer service counter you need to check that exchange poll civil wal-mart has one of the most for giving, taking almost all items for 90 days. the exception is e
. >> have there been environmental science associated with these data centers? >> absolutely. we have a whole chapter on the case of the amazon in northern virginia. amazon was assessed large fines. it was around $200,000. that is very high in the world. you do not see find that high very often. -- fines that high very often. they were not getting the environmental permits for those generators. they were running them and causing emissions without getting the proper permits. they tell me they have now obtained those permits in northern virginia. that is what amazon told me when i contacted them for this story. >> james glanz, the quincy experience, how is it that quincy has become a growth area for these data centers? >> that's right. half a dozen. yahoo is right there. microsoft is the biggest. these data centers tend to cluster. part of the reason is that if energy prices are low, you'll get a lot of these data centers coming in. but you have other factors that come into play. one is connectivity to the fiber-optic. there is a lot of fiber optic in quincy. other things like tax break
on nonfiction selection. these titles were included in the "christian science monitor"'s 15 best books of 2012-nonfiction. >> for an extended list of links to various
a cad -- academy of arts and sciences and sits on the board for the huffington post. adviced hillary clinton on technology and society, produced several films and named by "newsweek," as, quote, one of the women shaping the 21st century. she is a parent and is focused on making an impact, especially in our everyday use of technology and connection and her newest film is called "engage." take a look. [ speaking spanish ] >> that is your life clock. some day it's going to stop. a lot of things are going happen in the world between now and then, so what are you going to do while you're here? stand on the sidelines? or are you going to be part of something bigger? give a little bit, give a little bit of my life for you give a little bit, give a little bit of your life to me. >> tiffany, welcome back. you always are so fascinating to me. you're constantly re-inventing yourself. do you ever run out of new ideas? >> right now, i'm in a fertile period. and i'm always interested in the same thing and that is basically the internet. >> uh-huh. >> and how do we be mindful of how we're living in
happen at a nuclear plant. but experts say there isn't enough solid science in a draft outline, so they say they will need more time to finish their plans. >>> the nra decided to base the new guidelines on actual radiation readings. after the fukushima accident, authorities failed to get residents to evacuate promptly even though they had information from a radiation forecast system. the nra secretary is proposing the immediate evacuation of residents within 5 to 30 kilometers of a radiation plant when they reach 500 millisieverts per hour. they call for evacuation within a week's time if the level is at 20 millisieverts or more. but the panel of experts did not reach a consensus. some said the authority had simply decided on a level half that of international standard without enough scientific basis. others said the nra should adopt the international standard for the time being and continue discussions to set japan's own standards. >>> the operator of the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear plant is asking for more public money. they say the compensation payments are higher than th
everybody knows that it has nothing to do with science and yet japanese fleets travel from one side of the globe to another to engage in this and to break the moratorium year after year. >> the sea shepherd conservation society is on a boat planning to intercept the fleet saying a moratorium should be enforced. >> they should be enforcing this, but the international commission really does not have any teeth. there is no economic or political motivation for them to do so. there's no difference between what the japanese are doing and what elephant poachers are doing in kenya accept that in kenya, they are black, poor, and get shot for what they're doing. australia could send the military and escort them out of the area. there's a lot of trade deals and money at stake. japan is a very strong economic superpower a.m. they tend to get what they want. >> the global financial crisis has left millions of people without jobs. in south korea, youth unemployment is at nearly 7%. one group of graduates have come up with an unusual way to address the problem. >> it is a difference now let the 20
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
? [ applause ] also joining us is the science department chair and the lead author of the report that led to the blue-ribbon designation. so congratulations as well. [ applause ] >> go cardinals. >> do you want to say a few words? >> sure. i would like to thank the board of education, richard and all the outstanding student superintendent and staff and pta and i would like to give a shout out to dakota and jim and allison. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> i wanted to wait for all commendations to take place so that i don't take away from this, but what i would like to do is have some privilege here and maybe make last comments for my last general session after eight years of serving on the school board. i have to say it's been a real privilege to have been here for eight years in this capacity and working with everybody in the school community. i think we have done a lot in eight years. we have accomplished a lot. we have steadily gone uphill in regards to student outcomes. people are beginning to trust us a lot more now in regards to the public in terms of sending their kids to t
do not have the space most middle school have such as a gym, science lab or computer lab. locating an additional 300 middles schoolers on the campus raises concerns for a variety of reasons, most importantly the safety of young children on campus. my daughter has always been weary of the big kids. and i'm sure she is not alone. the idea of having over 300 more big kids on campus that will already have 140 middle schoolers and 13-14 and 168 in 15-16 is frightening for parents and children. if you have been to the campus and i do invite you to visit, you know how compacted the shared space already is. we look forward to the time when the annex is operational and question begin to use the refurbished space. i would like to make a quick [kph-epbgs/] mention of the capacity issue. capacity cannot be viewed only in terms of numbers of students per classroom. the capacity analysis must take into account specialty uses for assembly, library -- one more second please -- library, dance and art and we don't believe there is enough yard space to safely support the population of both schoo
. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes.
a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us your 5 and 6 briefly. >
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like ali
the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all about. we can see that it improves the basics. , u r her rider, your engagement is stronger. every improvement translates to about 14 years on the average. after they are trained, the improvement would give them the memory level of an average person of about 56. we see faster and sharper thinking and acting. almost everything you do that involves making a decision about what you have seen or heard or acting in a complex behavior. this is certainly important from the point of view of for your sustaining independence. this is kind of interesting thing, right? people see things so much better that they have about half as many driving accidents, it makes a big difference in the safety of driving and also walking. we have seen improvements in health. the person spends about $300 less a year in health-care costs, that is because the brain training confers benefits and also to physical health from th
, activities from 3:00 until midnight for kids. maryland science center is celebrating from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., music, crafts and a ball drops that's going to take place at noon if you want to keep your little ones up so late. if you venture out tonight, mike masco, bundle up, i say. >> i will be in bed by 10:00. >> really? >> i got to work tomorrow. >> the odd thing is, when you get in to come in, i will be getting up as the ball is dropping. >> all right. it going to be cold nonetheless. >> let me know what happens. all goes off without a hitch. >>> the weather will be fine for it. there is no problems, i don't see precipitation. if you are going to go to new york or local, things are okay. maybe things change. we will show you. outside, it's chilly out there, temperatures on most of the sites are in to the 20s, manchester the coldest spots. easton, 20s. glen burnie, feeling like 22. the windchills with the slight westerly wind feeling chilly. notice the clouds on top of us through the 2:00 hour on future trend, that's the deal today. as we move the timeline in to midnight, mostly cl
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> but what shouldn't change from the original constitution of america, surely. >> my faith isn't based on the constitution, it's based on -- >> i get that. but america in terms of its populism, it's about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie, daniel day lewis is brilliant as lincoln. but all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery apolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was perfectly acceptable. who was outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular at the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> right, but we had this discussion. >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says every man should be free. >> but you don't believe every man should be free and equal? >> of course we're free and of course we're equal. you can love anybody you want to. >> but
thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't matter that much. that the leader of any organization faces external constraint. if you are a ceo of a c
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokesperson, the antifeminist because he was the leader in the human rights of the party and the entire imperialists and the conservatives that said america's fascists are acting king wall street comes first and the american people second so we had enemies and they wanted to get rid of him on that ticket in 1944 but the problem was he was enormously popular. 65% they want wallace on the ticket and 2% said they wanted. truman that the question is how were they going to thwart this. roosevelt when the party busses started to come to him and they want to get the rottweilers of the tickets, roosevelt says to him i support him but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough. i'm depending on you guys to do it and he finally caved in and it was terrible that he did. his family was furious. every single one of them were furious. there were huge wallace supporters and he had the backing of labor and the black delegates at the conv
with doctorates in science, technology, engineering and math. two outgoing republican senators introducing legislation granting residence to those bought in the country illegally. though call it the achieve act, similar to the d.r.e.a.m. act. i spoke to one. bill's cosponsors, senator kay bailey hutchison. welcome to you here. how is your legislation different than the d.r.e.a.m. act? >> our legislation gives legal status to the young people in conundrum. they have grown up here. this is the country they know yet they are illegal because their parents brought them here before they were 14 years old. but we don't go into a citizenship track. we allow them to get in line behind the people who have been lawful and waited in line. so we don't give them a preference in line but we do give them a legal status and we don't prohibit them from getting in line if they choose to go the citizenship route. gerri: senator, what do you have to have to be able to be part of the program as you're defining it? >> you have to be under 14 when you came here and you have to be under 28 now. you can serve four
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our tech
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved ou
the sciences and humanities, which i don't think should be separated but often are, and let with other colleagues and researchers and create interesting collaborations. thank you so much. perhaps very appropriately, the great new zealand bibliographer donald francis mackenzie said if you know how to read it, every book is alive with the judgment of its maker. in the business of bibliography is learning how to read the human presences in every recorded task. and i think that we have certainly seen an example of how to recover those human judgments. those human presences through a capacious and db2 learned every article. he's he is the author of eight novels, two values in 10 volumes of essays in as many articles as some of our nations finest journals. a past deputy chairman of the national endowment for the humanities, he is the recipient of a national book critics circle award red the guggenheim and even a rock rockefeller award. when you think about his work in cytogenetics. i'm not entirely sure, but i'm sure that he can inform us about the nature of fiction, the book, and the future
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate. they're sort of modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk in, it's a bit like walking into a machine. inside they're incredibly loud, incredibly cold from all the air conditioners that keep the equipment cool. you often can't see the ceiling because it's obscured with cables. and there are usually cages around, you know, big steel cages maybe half the size of a hotel room that each belongs to a network, and that's where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire up to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnect that way. that is the actual physical interconnection in the internet work. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what are those wires made of, and what are they carrying? >> guest: the -- predominantly at the centers of the internet, they are fiberoptic cables. they're often yellow fibero
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront." is chuck hagel's nomination dead on arrival? now hagel, the former republican senator and vietnam war hero, could be president obama's choice to be the next defense secretary. but today he's under attack by a group of gay republicans known as the log cabin republicans. now, this full-page ad said hagel's wrong for the job because of a statement he made back in 1998, when he questioned whether, in his words, a quote, openly, aggressively gay nominee could be an effective u.s. ambassador. now, a lot's changed since then, and hagel has since apologized, though that has also come under attack for his somewhat controversial beliefs on israel, iraq, and iran. are these attacks justified, or is he just the latest political target in an ugly game of gotcha politics. "outfront" tonight, our all-star panel. ryan, let me start with you. let's look at chuck hagel's credentials. a vietnam war veteran, two purple hearts,
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> we're following breaking news tonight. it's a medical condition of secretary of state hillary clinton. hillary clinton is in a new york city hospital where she will remain for the next few days. doctors found a blood clot during a medical exam related to her concussion a few weeks ago. they want to keep her at new york presbyterian hospital for observations. >>> 26 hours before the fiscal cliff deadline and for now, lawmakers have hit an impasse. what happens if no deal is reached? specifically, how much would you pay in taxes? there's a calculator online to help you figure that out. we have a breakdown. >> if you want to have a sense of how the fiscal cliff could askts -- ask -- affect you specifically, in terms of how much more you
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